The Jennifer Claire Moore Foundation firmly believes in proper education and communication regarding the pressures, obstacles and influences in the lives of youth today.

In Regards to the Netflix Series 13 Reasons Why, we encourage ALL parents, guardians, educators and adults to…

GET INFORMEDSHARE & LISTENFOLLOW-UP

GET INFORMED:

  • Your child has access to watch this fictional and mature series if you do not have limits set on your Netflix account.
  • 13 Reasons Why includes scenes on sexual assault, rape, alcohol, drugs, adult language, and violence – including watching a suicide via wrist cutting.
  • If your child has watched this series, we highly encourage you to watch it as well. This will allow you to see firsthand what they have been exposed to and are trying to process.

SHARE & LISTEN:

  • Spend time discussing the series episode by episode.
  • Ask open ended questions about your student’s thoughts on the events within the series and how it relates to them.
  • Talk about your time as an adolescent and life today as an adult – the pressures and relationships you encounter.

FOLLOW-UP:

  • We know a onetime conversation is good; however, follow-up touches over several weeks and throughout your child’s forming years (till age 24) on their social, emotional, behavioral and mental health is much more effective.
  • Keeping TRUE open lines of communication between you and your child will provide them with a level of comfort and support only a parent / trusted adult can.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

We can all help prevent suicide!
RESOURCES FOR HELP

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline | 1-800-273-TALK(8255)
Crisis Text Line | Text HOME to 741741

Netflix 13 Reasons Why

Netflix has a trending new fictional series called 13 Reasons Why which concerns youth suicide. The series is rated TV-MA for adult viewers by Netflix, but it is being heavily watched by teens.

13 Reasons Why revolves around 17-year- old Hannah Baker who experiences terrible and painful events, many of which are perpetuated by classmates and others. She dies by suicide and leaves behind audio recordings for 13 people, each of whom she says were partly to blame for her death.

Suicide prevention experts are raising serious concerns about the WAY the series treats the issue of suicide. They believe it has the potential to trigger suicidal events, especially in vulnerable or impressionable youth.

Parents are encouraged to be informed and aware.

Please see the articles and links below so you can discuss and intervene with your kids as you feel
appropriate.

Netflix 13 Reasons Why: What Viewers Should Consider
April 24, 2017

Recently, Netflix released Thirteen Reasons Why (13RY), a series based on the book by Jay Asher originally published in 2007. The series is a fictional story that is meant to be a cautionary tale. It tells the story of a high school student who experiences a series of terrible events-many of which are perpetrated by her classmates and friends. Hannah has died by suicide but before she died she made a series of tapes explaining what each person in her circle has done to hurt her. Each episode tells one part of the story focused on a painful event and interaction.

The show has been highly watched by young people and has received lots of media attention. Because the show takes up issues related to suicide and sexual assault, there have been strong (and strongly mixed) reactions from many viewers along with several professional and advocacy groups. On the one hand, the series has potentially focused attention on and created an avenue for productive discussions around the meaning of friendship, how friends might support each other, the risks of mistreatment and assault and the issue of youth suicide. On the other hand, the depiction and circumstances of the suicide have raised concerns because there are several elements in the story that are inconsistent with safe messaging guidelines around handling portrayals of suicide in media and works of fiction.

What to do?

In light of the feedback about this show, on the day of its release, JED partnered with Suicide Awareness Voices of America (SAVE) to develop Talking Points to help clinicians and mental health professionals discuss the show with parents, young people and the media. Netflix was supportive of the distribution of the Talking Points and posted them along with crisis services and a link to additional information about young adult mental health on the official 13RY resource website. Netflix also filmed Beyond The Reasons as a tool to help parents and teens frame the conversation and encourage them to speak up and seek help. The show is rated TV MA and there are trigger warning cards prior to three of the episodes.

Here’s what we suggest young viewers and parents consider:

  • Make a considered and thoughtful decision about whether or not you choose to watch the show. If you have experienced significant depression, anxiety or suicidal thoughts or behaviors in the past, this show may be risky for you to watch.
  • If you choose to watch the show and are finding yourself distraught, depressed, or having thoughts of suicide or are having trouble sleeping, stop watching it and let a parent, trusted adult or counselor know. You can also text start to 741- 741 for confidential, professional help 24/7.
  • For those who choose to watch the show, consider watching it with others and taking breaks between episodes instead of binge-watching. It would be especially good to watch with parents or other trusted adults. Discuss what you are seeing and experiencing along the way.
  • This show does provide an opportunity to explore and discuss the meaning of friendship and how we make choices when we or friends are having troubles or are struggling. Viewers should consider how they might have made different choices from those made by characters in the story.
  • Whether you choose to watch this show or not, we should all work to be caring of and vigilant about our family members, friends and ourselves. If you or someone you know is struggling emotionally or showing signs indicating a possible suicidal crisis get them (or yourself) to help. Support from trusted friends and family, and professional mental health care when it is needed, save lives every day.